Own your stuff, it helps you identify the next course of action

As counter-intuitive as it seems, failures most certainly lead to the next version of ourselves that is stronger, smarter, intuitively aware and many other hard and soft skills.

Whatever the case, it's important to know exactly with whom and where the breakdown occurred. This will not be a "feel good" session, people learn better when it stings afterward. I speak from a tremendous amount of specific and life developing experience. Let the moment hit hard, it will pass.  What won't pass is the memory of those that become known as the ones that pass the buck, throw people under the bus, demonstrate negative integrity in the face of a challenge.
If you're going to be tasked with making far reaching business or personal impacts, you have to own the outcome.

You've gotta own your stuff.


If you're going to be tasked with making far-reaching business or personal impacts, you have to own the outcome.


Finger pointers, blame stormers, victims, or even that interesting group of people that like to imply that no one was really at fault have all become far too accepted.


As far as I can tell it's a two-pronged problem, 1. the person that made a mistake wants to appear blameless or 2. No one wants to have people or teams accountable. Constructively accountable.... This last part is important because it means there would be some type of mediation involved, and who wants to do that??

Because it's not REALLY about the blame game, it's about identifying the failure and then assessing the aftermath and determining the next course of action.

Whatever the case, it's important to know exactly with whom and where the breakdown occurred. This will not be a "feel good" session, people learn better when it stings afterwards. I speak from a tremendous amount of specific and life developing experience. Let the moment hit hard, it will pass.


What won't pass is the memory of those that become known as the ones that pass the buck, throw people under the bus, demonstrate negative integrity in the face of a challenge.

It's a big ask, especially at a time when everyone wants to look like a massive success at all times.

As counter-intuitive as it seems, failures most certainly lead to the next version of ourselves that is stronger, smarter, intuitively aware and many other hard and soft skills.


Own it.


PS: This article was first published in Chris Shyrock's Linkedin Blog